Cover of: Yeats, folklore, and occultism | Frank Kinahan

Yeats, folklore, and occultism

contexts of the early work and thought
  • 255 Pages
  • 0.78 MB
  • 8877 Downloads
  • English
by
Unwin Hyman , Boston
Yeats, W. B. 1865-1939 -- Knowledge -- Folklore, Yeats, W. B. 1865-1939 -- Knowledge -- Occultism, English poetry -- Celtic influences, Literature and folklore -- Ireland, Mythology, Celtic, in literature, Mythology, Celtic -- Ireland, Occultism in literature, Folklore -- Ir

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Ire

Other titlesYeats, folklore & occultism.
StatementFrank Kinahan.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPR5908.F64 K55 1988
The Physical Object
Paginationxxiii, 255 p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2402315M
ISBN 100048000620
LC Control Number87032603

Yeats, Folklore and Occultism: Contexts of the Early Work and Thought (Routledge Library Editions: W.

Description Yeats, folklore, and occultism FB2

Yeats) 1st Edition by Frank Kinahan (Author) › Visit Amazon's Frank Kinahan Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Format: Hardcover. Book Description. This lively introduction to the poems of W. Yeats, first published inprovides a series of intriguing new readings of his work in relation to his profound involvement with occultism and folklore.

This book provides an excellent introduction to the writings of W. Yeats, Irish national poet and occultist. The book contains important extracts from his beautiful writings which serve to illuminate various components of the Irish/Celtic tradition/5(10).

This lively introduction to the poems of W. Yeats, first published inprovides a series of intriguing new readings of his work in relation to his profound involvement with occultism and folklore. During Yeats's formative years as an artist, two compelling movements were emerging: the revivals of interest in Irish folklore 3/5(1).

If this be the case, Frank Kinahan argues in Yeats, Folklore and Occultism, then those works that the poet wrote in his twenties (which lasted till ) “should by rights reveal themselves as turning upon precisely the same kinds of tensions that made the later work so rich, and thereby as an integral part of a body of writing that was from start to finish of a single piece”.

In other words, it is wrong to try to Author: Kieran Quinlan. Genre/Form: Folklore: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Kinahan, Frank.

Yeats, folklore, and occultism. Boston: Unwin Hyman, (OCoLC) The young William Butler Yeats was introduced to the study and practice of the occult while in art college in Dublin - his instant fascination with the occult, metaphysics and paranormal activities. During Yeats' early career, there was an ongoing literary revival of interest in Irish legend and folklore.

Books with such titles as Ancient Legends, Mystic Charms, and Superstitions of Ireland, The Fireside Stories of Ireland, History of Ireland: Cuculain and his Contemporaries, Irish Folklore, and dozens of others were useful to the young Yeats (Kinahan XII). ByYeats would assert that, "[I had].

Yeats’s interest in Irish folklore began during his childhood in Sligo. Ernest Rhys, general editor of the Camelot Classics series, first contacted Yeats about preparing an edition of Croker’s Fairy Legends, but in July the project was changed to a selection of folklore.

Throughout the nineties, Yeats was an avid student of mythologies and occult systems. These influences culminated in the composition of The Secret Rose. Yeats was reportedly near collapse as he finished the volume, a struggle to forge from these correspondences his own unique mythology.

Details Yeats, folklore, and occultism FB2

Yeats, folklore, and occultism: contexts of the early work and thought. [Frank Kinahan] -- This lively introduction to the poems of W.B. Yeats, first published inprovides a series of intriguing new readings of his work in relation to his profound involvement with occultism and Your Web browser is not enabled for JavaScript.

Exploration of W.B. Yeats's ideas on folklore and how they speak to the broader idea of the aesthetic. Yeats, Philosophy, and the Occult is a collection of essays examining the thought of the Irish poet W.

Yeats and particularly his philosophical reading and explorations of older systems of thought, where philosophy, mysticism, and the supernatural blend. Yeats’ final book of Irish fairy legends, The Celtic Twilight, was published just one year after Irish Fairy Tales, in As a kind of spiritual successor to that which came before it, The Celtic Twilight erased the line between Yeats as narrator and ethnographer and his informants; his own educated approach was no longer illustrated as greater than that of their “lowly” folk customs.

This book is written by famed scholar, poet, and dramatist William Butler Yeats, a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival whose works are heavily influenced by Irish folklore.

Not long after beginning to read Joseph Campbell’s works on comparative mythologies I moved to Northern Ireland to study Irish literature and theatre/5. Yeats developed a lifelong interest in occult, metaphysics, and paranormal activities, which displayed through his poetry and writings (Mackean).

During the early period of his life W.B. Yeats was intent on becoming a considerable literary figure, and by the end of his life many considered him as one of theFile Size: KB.

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LTWBY Letters to W. Yeats. Vol. By Richard J. Finneran, George Mills Harper, William M. Murphy. New York: Colombia University Press, SA A Search for Authority: Prolegomena to a Definitive Critical Edition of W.B. Yeats’s A Vision (). By Connie Kelly Hood. Ann Arbor: University Microfilms, YO Yeats and the Occult.

Size: KB. Gonne shared Yeats’s interest in occultism and spiritualism. Yeats had been a theosophist, but in he turned from its sweeping mystical insights and joined the Golden Dawn, a. Yeats had a strong interest in spiritualism, Irish myths and legends, and his celebration of Irish culture is reflected in much of his poetry.

He was a master of the traditional verse and was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature in William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, dramatist, and prose writer, one of the greatest English-language poets of the 20th century.

He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in Yeats’s father, John Butler Yeats, was a barrister who eventually became a portrait painter. His mother, formerly Susan. words “W. Yeats” () “Translated into political terms, Yeats’s tendency is Fascist. Throughout most of his life, and long before Fascism was ever heard of, he had had the outlook of those who reach Fascism by the aristocratic route.

Yeats had a lifelong interest in mysticism, spiritualism, occultism and astrology. He read extensively on the subjects throughout his life, became a member of the paranormal research organisation " The Ghost Club " (in ) and was especially influenced by the writings of Emanuel Swedenborg.

[30]. William Butler Yeats and The Little People. Excerpt from: Strange Magazine, Number 4, ISSN P.O. BoxRockville, MD In the late s, William Butler Yeats came into contact with two very unrelated movements, the Irish nationalists and the Theosophists (an occult/magical sect), and took an active part in both In he was "excommunicated" from the Theosophists by.

This collection brings together all of W. Yeats s published prose writings on Irish folklore, legend and myth, with pieces on subjects including ghosts, kidnappers, fairies, ancient tribes, precious stones and Gaelic love songs.

Through his researches on Irish folklore, Yeats attempted to create a movement in literature that was enriched by and rooted in a vital native tradition.

William Butler Yeats published his poem ‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ in December ofan important year in his life due to his increased association with occult societies in London, United Kingdom.

The gyre, so central an image in “The Second Coming,” stands for Yeats’ theory of time and history, and it belongs to an old mysticism and folklore that for him were synonymous with poetry. Crowley viewed the occult as a source of personal powerhis revelations filled books devoted to explaining the philosophy of Thelema (“Do what.

Mythology in W. Yeast's Early Poetry interest in mythology and the oral traditions and folklore. Books. Yeats, Folklore, and Occultism: Early work and Thought (Boston: University of. Yeats, Philosophy, and the Occult is a collection of essays examining the thought of the Irish poet W.

Yeats and particularly his philosophical reading and explorations of older systems of thought, where philosophy, mysticism, and the supernatural blend.

It opens with a broad survey of the current state of Yeats scholarship, which also includes an examination of Yeats’s poetic practice.

Born and educated in Dublin, Ireland, William Butler Yeats discovered early in his literary career a fascination with Irish folklore and the occult. Later awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature inYeats produced a vast collection of stories, songs, and poetry of /5(32).

The Celtic Twilight () is a book of encounters. The encounters Yeats writes of are the meetings between the Irish people and the faeries, but equally interesting are those other encounters: the meetings between the young Protestant poet and the Catholic Irish who tell him their ancient stories so that he can write them down in this book.4/5.

The book that this is taken from, W.B. Yeats in Context, was published by Cambridge University Press earlier this year, and features 38 contributors who deal with the various aspects of his life and times.

It sells for $ dollars U.S. Inthe publisher, Routledge, issued Yeats and Theosophy by Ken Monteith. A more misleading title could.Yeats’s career falls roughly into three phases. An early romantic period produced work saturated by folklore, occultism, and Celtic mythology, such as the collection The Wanderings of Oisín () and the play The Countess Cathleen (, first performed ).

The latter stirred particular religious controversy among Roman Catholics.W. B. Yeats: (William Butler Yeats), –, Irish poet and playwright, b. Dublin. The greatest lyric poet Ireland has produced and one of the major figures of 20th-century literature, Yeats was the acknowledged leader of the Irish literary renaissance.

Early Life.